Europe’s top tech news, July 2016

@sogotechnews

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Enlarge / A map of scientific collaboration within Europe. (credit: Olivier H. Beauchesne)

July in Europe was a month of big acquisition news. The deals involving British, Czech, Norwegian, Chinese, and Japanese firms saw amounts from £450 million (€533 million) to £24 billion (€29 billion) changing hands. Predictably, many other major business stories emerged out of the fallout of Brexit, where some are pushing to save Europe’s economy, while others circle around London preying on its fintech startup scene.

Check out what’s happened in Europe this month:

Google’s DeepMind AI will use 1 million NHS eye scans to spot common diseases earlier. The company has announced a partnership with the NHS’s Moorfields Eye Hospital in London for a five-year research project that will draw on anonymous eye scans held on Moorfields’ patient database. The hope is that this will allow diagnoses of common causes of sight loss, like diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration, to be spotted more rapidly and hence be treated more effectively. For example, Google says that up to 98 percent of sight loss resulting from diabetes can be prevented by early detection and treatment.

Read 17 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read Original: ArsTechnica

Europe’s top tech news, July 2016

@sogotechnews

europe-interconnected-science-research-640x336

Enlarge / A map of scientific collaboration within Europe. (credit: Olivier H. Beauchesne)

July in Europe was a month of big acquisition news. The deals involving British, Czech, Norwegian, Chinese, and Japanese firms saw amounts from £450 million (€533 million) to £24 billion (€29 billion) changing hands. Predictably, many other major business stories emerged out of the fallout of Brexit, where some are pushing to save Europe’s economy, while others circle around London preying on its fintech startup scene.

Check out what’s happened in Europe this month:

Google’s DeepMind AI will use 1 million NHS eye scans to spot common diseases earlier. The company has announced a partnership with the NHS’s Moorfields Eye Hospital in London for a five-year research project that will draw on anonymous eye scans held on Moorfields’ patient database. The hope is that this will allow diagnoses of common causes of sight loss, like diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration, to be spotted more rapidly and hence be treated more effectively. For example, Google says that up to 98 percent of sight loss resulting from diabetes can be prevented by early detection and treatment.

Read 17 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read Original: ArsTechnica